Mr acker bilk with leon young string chorale only you - Acker Bilk - Wikipedia


Below is the list of all artists, bands, duets, trios, etc. whose sheet music is at least partially reviewed on this site in alphabetically order. Click on the name one of artists, you will be brought to the page that lists all sheet music by that particular artist that are currently available on .

Six tracks on the updated 'millionaires' list were released in 2017, including Ed Sheeran's Shape Of You, Clean Bandit's Symphony ft. Zara Larsson and Rag'n'Bone Man's Human. According to Official Charts Company data, in the last year alone 98m singles have been sold in the UK and music fans have generated an extraordinary 44 BILLION audio streams. 

But my biggest brush with CKLW was being a contestant in early 1969 in its "Time Machine" contest. The contestant picked any year of the 20th century in advance. Then the station played its account of a news event. If the event happened in the year you guessed, you won $500. Of course, the thought of playing it was a pipe dream, because you'd get a busy signal after dialing the fourth digit; it was practically a reflex action to hang up and try again when the voice on the other line told me I was the correct caller. The year of the event from the last hour was 1917; I made up my mind to guess 1965. The event? The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution -- 1964. Just one year away from $500! As Maxwell Smart would have said, "Missed it by THAT MUCH!" I did get a little 1969 calendar just for playing. The next phone line to be jammed was mine as friends from school -- all of whom listened to CKLW -- tried to call me to tell me that they had heard me.

Bilk continued to tour with his Paramount Jazz Band, as well as performing concerts with his two contemporaries, Chris Barber and Kenny Ball , both of whom were born in 1930, as "The 3Bs". Bilk also provided vocals on many of his tracks, including on "I'm an Old Cowhand", "The Folks Who Live on the Hill", "White Cliffs of Dover", "Travellin On" and "That's My Home".

The idea of 7" singles playing at 33-1/3 rpm was hardly new when Columbia re-introduced that format to the public in 1959. Back in the late 1940s, when Columbia and RCA-Victor were battling to see which speed would replace the 78, Columbia went all the way and started issuing their now-microgroove singles on the 33 speed (see example, below right). They even added radial "rumble strips" around the label to keep them from slipping when on a changer. But they were just weren't popular with record buyers and 45s quickly won out for singles. Columbia had to be content with a victory on albums. By mid-1952, the 7" 33 singles were banished from Columbia's catalog (they had never been in other catalogs).

When rival RCA-Victor jumped in on the stereo 45s in a big way in 1958, Columbia sat back and waited. Ultimately, they totally refused to give in to RCA's stereo-45 singles, although the did start issuing stereo EPs in February, 1959. Instead, they re-introduced their brainchild 33-single, this time in stereo, during the summer of 1959.

A bad idea is also a bad idea ten years later, usually. The record buying public still disliked the 33s. As singles, you couldn't put your thumb through a stack of them to keep from dropping them, and the fidelity wasn't much improvement, if any, to most customers' ears. Within a very few months, Columbia's dream of a single-speed industry (at 33-1/3, of course) failed completely.

By the start of 1960, the only solid customer the stereo-33 single had was the juke box operators, who stocked their stereo juke boxes with them. All the record labels began shipping stereo-33 singles to the juke box people in little packets of five discs, along with title strips for the juke boxes and 5x5-inch slick photos of the album from which the packet was derived. The juke box folks loved it.

A vast majority of the stereo-33 singles listed in this discography started as part of a 5-disc package for juke boxes. By 1962, the idea of selling stereo-33 singles at the local record store was about done, and the juke boxers started going for stereo EPs and "Little LPs" with three songs on each side, costing the listener 25 cents instead of one song for 10 cents. The Little LPs lasted much longer than the stereo- 33 singles, reaching into the 1970s.

We would appreciate any additions or corrections to this discography. Just send them to us via e-mail . Both Sides Now Publications is an information web page. We are not a catalog, nor can we provide the records listed below. We have no association with any of these record labels. Should you be interested in acquiring the stereo singles listed in this discography (which are all out of print), we suggest you see our Frequently Asked Questions page and follow the instructions found there. This story and discography are copyright 2014, 2015 by Mike Callahan.

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Mr Acker Bilk With Leon Young String Chorale Only YouMr Acker Bilk With Leon Young String Chorale Only YouMr Acker Bilk With Leon Young String Chorale Only YouMr Acker Bilk With Leon Young String Chorale Only You

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